Remix Battle: It’s CRNKN vs. filous In the Battle Over Dillon Francis and Kygo’s “Coming Over”

Posted by Matt Mueller 6 months ago in Music

remix battle dillon francis kygo coming cover crnkn filous slider

Remix Battle is back at it again, this time with the face-meltingly popular song “Coming Over,” by tropical house god Kygo, and EDM/Snapchat superstar Dillon Francis.

An ode to crumbling relationships everywhere, “Coming Over” possesses a certain lyrical-rhythmic dissonance by way of an upbeat, almost cheery beat.

A song this popular was bound to get remixed by everyone and their mother. Luckily, we at IHC have the enviable position of doubling down and weeding through the rough to find the diamonds before pitting them against one another in a fight to the death.

This week, our soldiers of fortune are filous and CRNKN, two producers who almost one upped the original “Coming Over” with their own versions.

Which will reign supreme?

filous

First up, in the red corner, we have filous. The 18 year-old Austrian producer focuses more on the production itself than the lyrics, speeding up the vocals to push into a more melodic beat that takes what’s in Kygo’s wheelhouse, and goes a step further.

It’s a flowery tempo that would be a mistake on the of “Donald-Trump-as-President” proportions if you didn’t put on your summer playlist. It’s a breeze-in-your-hair, sand-between-your-toes kind of song that illuminates a certain image in listeners’ minds.

Some have called filous’ cover uninspired, plain, and just another song riding the tropical house wave for all it’s worth, making it the decided underdog in this fist-fight. But underdogs have nothing to lose, which  makes them fight dirty.

CRNKN

In the blue corner lies CRNKN, ready to lay the smackdown on poor little filous. CRNKN starts slow, building to a tempo until the introduction of a drumbeats make it clear that this is an entirely different beast.

Much like tropical house, CRNKN plays with another recent genre getting a lot of attention: future bass. His drop melts face, sending listeners into a heavy, trap-influenced reverb that’s more “warehouse rager” than “summer road trip.”

The producer all but abandons the emotion that was originally concepted with the track, instead using the humanizing element of the song as a platform to lead into his drops, rather than being at the forefront. But when your song’s this lit, who the fuck cares?

Vote for your favorite below!

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